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Page 697

1 Leave a comment on paragraph 1 0 Rome 697

2 Leave a comment on paragraph 2 0 in very bright colors and excellent preservation, but very stiff and questionable anatomy, dug up from some ancient building- Many busts and statues of ancient celebrities- The upper grand saloon is wonderfully rich in prescious-stone [sic] articles. Three porphyry tables, solid, three by eight feet, a porphyry bath-tub, vases +c A jasper vase four feet high. Nineteen Emperors busts cut in porphyry with alabaster drapery. Walls of polished marbles in all colors inlaid-

3 Leave a comment on paragraph 3 0 But the most celebrated piece is a full length marble figure reclining on a sofa (the cushion and pillow of marble) of a beautiful lady, almost nude, representing Venus. The chief attraction consists in the fact that it is Pauline Borghese herself, sister of Napoleon the Great, by Canova the Great.

4 Leave a comment on paragraph 4 0 It is said that a friend wishing to sympathise [sic] with her exposure of person said to her “why how could you sit so naked”, “Oh, she said innocently, “very easily for the room was quite warm”.

5 Leave a comment on paragraph 5 0 From the upper balconies we enjoyed a fine panorama. In the rear a private Park containing nearly an hundred beautiful white Deer, and in front our [sic] drives, walks, and thirty six carriages huddled together awaiting the visitors.

6 Leave a comment on paragraph 6 0 Eighty three steps (Mrs Castle says so, and she always counts them) takes us below again through scores of mutilated statues, limbs, +c ancient relics which the Prince would not sell for any price although he has become quite poor, but pride makes him keep them.

7 Leave a comment on paragraph 7 0 Next-ly [sic] to the large church of San Maria Maggiore on the Esqueline [sic], said to have been begun in AD 352 by the Pope Liberius in consequence of simultaneous drams by him and the Roman Patrician Johnannes followed on the next day (although it was the 5th of August in this hot climate) by a miraculous fall of snow.

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Source: http://wadetravels.org/?page_id=2059